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20121201
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, and she cried. it is wrong. >> he is turning over handguns to the police. it is part of the bridgeport gun by back. with $100,000 of private donations, the police are taking the weapons, no questions asked. >> i know that every gun that we take the and it is one less that has the potential to kill children. >> more than 100 guns have been collected in the past two days and are expected to be melted down. with millions more scattered across the west, can this make an impact? >> we know that if we reduce the number of weapons that are available through breaking into people's houses, we are a safer society. >> the bridgeport police chief say is that an attempt to organize a similar gun buyback last year failed to lead. it failed due to lack of funding, but not this time. >> we have seen an outpouring from the community since sandy hook, from all manners from teddy bears to cash, and i think this is part of it. i think that people want to feel safe. >> for porter, a gun locked safely in his home ended up in the hands of his foster child, who handed it to a gay member. >> -- gang member. >> if
. the goal was to collect handguns and assault rifles. and in bridgeport, connecticut, a ground swell of gun owners supported the buyback. cnn's david arrest owes at that looks at how the shooting rampage is prompting people to say goodbye to their weapons. >> reporter: william porter says he is done with guns. the elementary school shooting in nearby newtown, connecticut struck a nerve. >> my wife cried. we were out shopping. and we heard it while we were in the store. and she cried. you know? it's wrong. >> okay. how are you doing? >> i'm good. >> reporter: porter is turning over his handgun to police in connecticut's most popular city. part of bridgeport's largest gun buyback ever. and with well over $100,000 in private donations, police are taking the weapons, no questions asked. >> i know that every gun we take in is one less gun that has a potential to kill our children. >> reporter: more than 100 guns have been collected in each of the first two days, and are expected to be melted down. but with millions more scattered across the u.s., can buybacks like this one make a dent? >> these
from stamford, bridgeport, new haven and other communities around there. jenna: questions remain as you mentioned and we're working to get some of those answers as this story develops. here are some live scene shoots we have into our newsroom. vito, one of the things we're working to get is a picture in the local newspaper being reported on the associated press. apparently this local newspaper has a photo of younger students, some crying, some looking frightened according to this description, being escorted by adults through a parking lot in line, hands on each other's shoulders. the number one thing is to try to get the kids out of the school. at this point, hour and a half after this news breaks is it likely all the students are out? >> i would, i would doubt that right now. it takes a while. you're not dealing with high school kids, even middle schoolkids, very quickly they can go out. you're dealing with five to 10-year-olds probably scared out of their wits right now. little by little you have to take them out. make sure there is not anybody else or bad guy in this area. looks like
,200 homicides. >>> the sandy hook school shooting has had an immediate affect on one city. police in bridgeport, connecticut, are determined to get guns off the streets by buying them back using $100,000 in donations from the public. here's david arioso. >> reporter: william porter says he is done with guns. the elementary school shooting in nearby newtown, connecticut, struck a nerve. >> my wife cried. we was out shopping and heard it while we was in the store. she cried. you know, it's wrong. >> how are you, sir? >> reporter: porter is turning over his handgun to police in connecticut's most populous city, the largest gun buyback ever. with well over $100,000 in private donations, police are taking the weapons no questions asked. >> i know that every gun we take in is one less gun that has the potential to kill our children. >> reporter: more than 100 guns have been collected in the first two days and are expected to e melted down. but can buybacks like this make a dent? >> these guns could have created victims. we know that if we can reduce the number of weapons that are available through b
into bridgeport, connecticut and once you start heading to upstate new york, it's accumulation. we're talking about a foot or more for upstate new york, 3 to 6 for places like massachusetts, worcester and the berkshires. the pocono mountains will see about 6 inches of snow and into northwestern new jersey you're still looking at snow as well. this is a strong area of low pressure, it will work its way across the northeast. the cold air coming in behind it will help enhance the heaviest snow across the great lakes and extreme northern new england. we're also experiencing some bitterly cold temperatures right here in the south. this morning it's 35 in atlanta, 33 in birmingham. the cold air is here. for southerners this is a big deal. we're not used to this cold weather. back to you. >> none of us are. bonnie schneider, thanks so much. >>> the storm has done considerable damage in the southern states. take a look at incredible video we have from a surveillance camera. this is from a walgreens in mobile, bomb bomb. this is from a walgreens in mobile, alabama. >> i've never been in a war zone but
creek and then to the right in bridgeport, just a street devastated by water damage. all of this, for us, is cumulative which is to say it's on top of the destruction caused by two other events in the last year, hurricane irene in august, 011, and then by winter storm alfred in october of 201 . the total cost of damage from these three storms over the last year is almost $ billion, which is a very significant amount for a small state like hours -- like ours which has its own budget shortfall right now. madam chairman, as you referenced, we seem to be entering an age of increasingly violent storms so i think we've got to think carefully about whether and how to rebuild and location -- in locations we know are vulnerable and likely to be hit again that means as we go forward, we've got to have some vision and think about how we replace critical infrastructure, for instance, during each of the three storms in connecticut in the past year, we've been most seriously impacted in many ways by long-term power outages 1ru89 of our ages electrical distribution system. therefore, i hope we're going
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6